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Gut microbial dataset of a foraging tribe from rural West Bengal - insights into unadulterated and transitional microbial abundance
S GANGULI, S PAL, K DAS, , S S BAGCHI
Published in Elsevier Inc.
2019
Volume: 25
   
Abstract
The human gut microbiome contributes to a broad range of biochemical and metabolic functions that directly or indirectly affect human system. Numerous factors such as age, geographical location, genetic makeup, and individual health status significantly influence the diversity, stability, and relative abundance of the gut microbiome. Of the mentioned factors, geographical location and dietary practices appears to explain a significant portion of microbiome variation. On the other hand tribal people living in geographically isolated areas and dependent on their traditional food sources are considered as having relatively unadulterated gut as their guts are least colonized by Western diet. The Western diet — low in fiber and high in refined sugars — is basically wiping out species of bacteria from our intestines. That's the conclusion Smits (2017) and his team reached after analyzing the Hadza microbiome at one stage of their year long study. The trend was clear: The further away people's diets are from a Western diet, the greater the variety of microbes they tend to have in their guts. And that includes bacteria that are missing from American guts."So whether it's people in Africa, Papua New Guinea or South America, communities that live a traditional lifestyle have common gut microbes — ones that we all lack in the industrialized world. In this work we present a pilot study data of the gut microbiome of an ethnic tribe of West Bengal, India, originating from Dravidian descent - the Savars. These are nomadic tribes and are still dependent on hunting and gathering for their livelihood. We identified a healthy family and have analysed their stool samples for gut microbial profiles. © 2019
About the journal
JournalData powered by TypesetData in Brief
PublisherData powered by TypesetElsevier Inc.
ISSN2352-3409
Open AccessYes